Details and Locations for Refugee Primary Care

What

The health screening done at the Health Department covers basic immunization, but it is not a thorough physical exam that will identify major health needs. Therefore, refugees need to establish primary care. Once primary care is established, an appointment for a physical exam is made. The physical exam helps find undiagnosed problems and also focus on less urgent, but still important, health needs.

Where

The physical exam takes place at various health clinics, depending on the refugee’s listed Medicaid provider. See the links at the bottom of the page for instructions for each facility.

When

The wait for an appointment can be over two months; it happens as soon as we can get an appointment.

Duration

The exam usually takes 1-2 hours.

What to bring

Medicaid card; ID (state ID; I-94 & employment verification ID; or passport if they have one); $3.00 copay for the visit; cash for possible prescriptions ($3 each); any medicines/medicine bottles they have (even if they are not taking the medicine currently); any medical records, x-rays, or immunization records; any referrals.

How to help

Please arrive at least 30 minutes before the appointment. If interpretation is needed, community health centers (like Lincoln Community Health Center) have access to a language line; the refugee or volunteer should request to use this line. Volunteers can guide the refugee through the appointment (new patient registration forms, checking in, etc), and help them learn how to do it themselves as they go. Many refugees don’t know that they can and should ask any questions or express any health concerns at this time. You can inform the nurse or doctor of any health concerns that you are aware of. You can also tell either the refugees (through the interpreter) that they need to ask any questions at this time, or remind the doctor to encourage them to ask questions and express needs. You should then leave and wait for the refugee to return. A reminder: the purpose of establishing primary care is for prevention and regular/ongoing medical oversight; it is not just a one-time physical exam.  Volunteers may want to teach refugees to ask when they should return for their next visit, and help them understand what their Medicaid coverage means.

Who to Contact

World Relief Durham staff make the physical exam appointment. Contact a World Relief Durham volunteer coordinator for questions regarding any appointment details.

Primary Care Locations & Instructions


 

 

Lincoln Community Health Center - Primary Care Appointments

Lincoln Community Health Center

Address: 1301 Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27717

Phone: (919) 956-4000

  1. Plan to arrive to Lincoln Community Health Center at least 30 minutes prior to the first scheduled primary care appointment of the refugees you are assisting.
  2. If picking up refugee(s) from their apartment, before you leave for the appointment, ask to see their Medicaid cards and medical history documents. The refugees may not have received any medical history documents yet, so you can attend the appointment without those documents. However, they must bring the Medicaid cards.
  3. If the refugee(s) are meeting you at the health center, then meet there at the time given to you by a WRD staff member. Typically this will be 30 minutes to 1 hour prior to the appointment.
  4. Park in the parking lot or on street parking surrounding the health center.
  5. Enter through the front doors of the building and approach the information desk directly ahead
  6. Inform the administrator that you have patients attending their first primary care appointments who need to complete new patient enrollment paperwork
  7. The administrator will direct you on completing new patient enrollment paperwork. You will need to look at the refugee(s) Medicaid cards to gather information such as the correct spelling of a name, birth date, and Medicaid number when assisting with filling out the paperwork. Ask the administrator about any questions with regards to completing the paperwork.
  8. When finished, return the new patient enrollment paperwork to the administrator at the information desk. They will give you a number in line, and you will wait until being called back to meet with a different administrator.
  9. When you meet with the administrator, remember that the refugee is the patient and you are simply an advocate. Allow the refugee to answer questions independently if possible, and only step in if needed to assist in responding. If any part of the paperwork has not been completed by this point, the administrator will assist you in completing it.
  10. Once this meeting is finished, you will accompany the refugee(s) to check in for their primary care appointment.
  11. If the appointment is for adults, you will stand in the check in line to the right of the information desk (if you are facing the information desk). If you are checking in children, you will head straight down the hallway on the right of the information desk (if you are facing the information desk). At the end of the hallway on your left there will be a line to check in children for primary care appointments.
  12. At check in, you may ask refugees that speak English to inform the administrator that they are checking in for their first primary care appointment. For refugees that do not speak English, you can communicate with the administrator and remind them of the refugee’s need for Language Line during the appointment (Language Line is an over-the-phone interpretation service offered by the health center).
  13. Give the refugees the primary care appointment handout from World Relief that they will show to the nurse or doctor.
  14. Ensure the refugees know the bus route to return to their apartment. From Lincoln Community Health Center to Oak Creek Village: From the health center, take bus 5 to Durham Station, From Durham Station, take bus 10 to Oak Creek Village.
  15. You may choose to wait until the refugees finish their appointment in order to assist with any follow up instructions from their physician. You may also choose to leave and inform the refugees to take the bus back to their apartment when their appointments are finished.

Back to Locations


 

Duke Outpatient Clinic Registration

What

Duke Outpatient Clinic is a primary care facility. Refugees need to be registered as patients at Duke Outpatient Clinic so they can get physical exams and other medical appointments.

Where

Duke Outpatient Clinic : 4220 North Roxboro Road, Durham, NC 27704 (Note: The larger building in which the clinic is housed says Durham Medical Center on the outside. Once inside, walk upstairs and the front desk for Duke Outpatient Clinic will be in front of you, just slightly to your left.)

What to bring

The whole IOM bag (you will need the I-94 and a copy of lease); case information sheet (from our office, or the information will be given to you in an email).

Duration

Approximately one hour.

Process

You can request an appointment either online or by phone. To register online, go to the Duke Health website (go to the left sidebar, click “Patient and Visitor Info,” then click “Appointments”). Click “Request an appointment—New Patients” and fill out the information requested. To register by phone, call the number listed on the website and ask to make an appointment for a new patient.

When you walk in, you can go to the registration desk and tell the receptionist you need to register a new patient (or group of patients). The receptionist will hand you clipboards with paperwork to fill out and a number which will be called.

Fill out paperwork (information needed should be found on the documents you brought). It will also ask for dates of births, address and whether they are on Medicaid. The answer is always “Yes” unless we’ve told you otherwise. There is an area where it asks you to list everyone in the household who works and has income. This list should actually be left blank because (typically) no one in the household works at this point and has income.

Hold onto the paperwork until your number is called. Then you can follow the staff person who called your number, and they will take the paperwork from you. They will enter the information into their computer, ask for copies of the I-94s and TSA letter (the piece of paper with the family’s photos printed on it), and ultimately issue the refugee a registration card. At this point it’s important to check the spelling of the name and the date of birth listed on the card because these are often entered incorrectly and can cause trouble later. You can write down the patient number from the card for your use later if you’re planning to make them future appointments. Otherwise, simply advise the refugee to keep this card safe, not lose it, and to bring it with them to every medical appointment to show at time of check-in. Once you have the registration cards you’re done and you can take them home!

Additional Information

If the staff ask for an interpreter, tell the person it is their responsibility to provide one under Title VI. You can ask the person at the front desk in case they need to prepare to have a phone set up for the interpreter. You can also ask about registering for transportation at this time.

Back to Locations


 

Capital Physicians Group

What

Refugees need to be registered as patients at Capital Physicians Group so they can get physical exams and other medical appointments

Where

Capital Physicians Group: 3126 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27612

What to bring

The whole IOM bag (you will need the I-94 and a copy of lease); case information sheet (from our office, or the information will be given to you in an email); all the forms listed on their website (Patient Information Form, Adult Health History Form, Review System Chart Form, HIPPA Release Form, Blood Pressure Log, Blood Sugar Log), picture ID, insurance card, current medications.

Duration

Approximately one hour.

Process

To set up an appointment, call the number listed on their website. Please arrive 20 minutes prior to the appointment time so that new patients’ information can be entered into their computer system.

When you walk in, you can go to the registration desk and tell the receptionist you need to register a new patient (or group of patients). The receptionist will hand you clipboards with paperwork to fill out and a number which will be called.

Fill out paperwork (information needed should be found on the documents you brought). It will also ask for dates of births, address and whether they are on Medicaid. The answer is always “Yes” unless we’ve told you otherwise. There is an area where it asks you to list everyone in the household who works and has income. This list should actually be left blank because (typically) no one in the household works at this point and has income.

Hold onto the paperwork until your number is called. Then you can follow the staff person who called your number, and they will take the paperwork from you. They will enter the information into their computer, ask for copies of the I-94s and TSA letter (the piece of paper with the family’s photos printed on it), and ultimately issue the refugee a registration card. At this point it’s important to check the spelling of the name and the date of birth listed on the card because these are often entered incorrectly and can cause trouble later. You can write down the patient number from the card for your use later if you’re planning to make them future appointments. Otherwise, simply advise the refugee to keep this card safe, not lose it, and to bring it with them to every medical appointment to show at time of check-in. Once you have the registration cards, you’re done and you can take them home!

Additional Information

If the staff ask for an interpreter, tell the person it is their responsibility to provide one under Title VI. You can ask the person at the front desk in case they need to prepare to have a phone set up for the interpreter. You can also ask about registering for transportation at this time.

Back to Locations


 

UNC Family Medicine Registration

What

Refugees need to be registered as patients at UNC Family Medicine so they can get physical exams and other medical appointments.

Where

UNC Family Medicine Clinic: 590 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599

Bring

The whole IOM bag (you will need the I-94 and a copy of lease); case information sheet (from our office, or the information will be given to you in an email); insurance card, photo ID, current medications, co-payment.

Bring your UNC Medical Record Number. If you do not have one, contact UNC Healthcare Patient Registration at 919-966-2555 to obtain one prior to your visit.

Complete a patient medical history form (found on their website under “New Patients”).

Duration

Approximately one  hour.

Process

To set up a new appointment, call the number listed on their website under “Appointments by Phone.” Arrive 15 minutes prior to the appointment.

When you walk in, you can go to the registration desk and tell the receptionist you need to register a new patient (or group of patients). The receptionist will hand you clipboards with paperwork to fill out and a number which will be called.

Fill out paperwork (information needed should be found on the documents you brought). It will also ask for dates of births, address and whether they are on Medicaid. The answer is always “Yes” unless we’ve told you otherwise. There is an area where it asks you to list everyone in the household who works and has income. This list should actually be left blank because (typically) no one in the household works at this point and has income.

Hold onto the paperwork until your number is called. Then you can follow the staff person who called your number, and they will take the paperwork from you. They will enter the information into their computer, ask for copies of the I-94s and TSA letter (the piece of paper with the family’s photos printed on it), and ultimately issue the refugee a registration card. At this point it’s important to check the spelling of the name and the date of birth listed on the card because these are often entered incorrectly and can cause trouble later. You can write down the patient number from the card for your use later if you’re planning to make them future appointments. Otherwise, simply advise the refugee to keep this card safe, not lose it, and to bring it with them to every medical appointment to show at time of check-in. Once you have the registration cards, you’re done and you can take them home!

Additional Information

If the staff ask for an interpreter, tell the person it is their responsibility to provide one under Title VI. You can ask the person at the front desk in case they need to prepare to have a phone set up for the interpreter.  You can also ask about registering for transportation at this time.

Back to Locations


 

Carrboro Community Health

What

Refugees need to be registered as patients at Carrboro Community Health Center so they can get physical exams and other medical appointments.

Where

Carrboro Community Health Center: 301 Lloyd Street, Carrboro, NC 27510-1821

Bring

The whole IOM bag (you will need the I-94 and a copy of lease); case information sheet (from our office, or the information will be given to you in an email)

Duration

Approximately one  hour.

Process

Make a new-patient appointment by calling the number listed on their website. When you walk in, you can go to the registration desk and tell the receptionist you need to register a new patient (or group of patients). The receptionist will hand you clipboards with paperwork to fill out and a number which will be called.

Fill out paperwork (information needed should be found on the documents you brought). It will also ask for dates of births, address and whether they are on Medicaid. The answer is always “Yes” unless we’ve told you otherwise. There is an area where it asks you to list everyone in the household who works and has income. This list should actually be left blank because (typically) no one in the household works at this point and has income.

Hold onto the paperwork until your number is called. Then you can follow the staff person who called your number, and they will take the paperwork from you. They will enter the information into their computer, ask for copies of the I-94s and TSA letter (the piece of paper with the family’s photos printed on it), and ultimately issue the refugee a registration card. At this point it’s important to check the spelling of the name and the date of birth listed on the card because these are often entered incorrectly and can cause trouble later. You can write down the patient number from the card for your use later if you’re planning to make them future appointments. Otherwise, simply advise the refugee to keep this card safe, not lose it, and to bring it with them to every medical appointment to show at time of check-in. Once you have the registration cards, you’re done and you can take them home!

Additional Information:  If the staff ask for an interpreter, tell the person it is their responsibility to provide one under Title VI. You can ask the person at the front desk in case they need to prepare to have a phone set up for the interpreter.  You can also ask about registering for transportation at this time.

Back to Locations