Please access the below links for health screening steps for each location

 

Health Screening in Durham County

Health Screening in Chapel Hill & Carrboro

Health Screening in Wake County

 


 

Health Screenings in Durham County

Every refugee has an initial health screening, which includes immunizations, a blood test, and a skin test to see if they have had any previous exposure to TB. Please note that it is rare for a refugee to have active TB. The purpose of the test is to determine whether there has been any previous exposure which should be treated with a precautionary series of medicine.

Assisting a refugee with a health screening

When?

Health Screenings are scheduled months in advance and last for approximately 2-3 hours. Volunteers and refugees need to arrive to the screening 15-20 minutes EARLY. Due to new efficiency measures at the Health Department, patients will not be seen at all if they are late (the exception being at the TB clinic). Missed appointments are extremely difficult to reschedule.

Before the day of the appointment

  • Google Maps to provide the refugees with directions. This way, the refugee will also know how to get home on the day of the appointment or how to return to the health department for a follow-up appointment.
  • If the refugees being transported have children under age 8, arrange to provide age-appropriate car seats. You may provide them yourself or pick them up from the World Relief office

Day of the appointment

  • 20 minutes early
  • Before leaving their home, check that the refugees have with them:
    • I-94 cards (or Visa if an SIV case)
    • Medicaid Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Social Security Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Vaccination Records
    • Medical Records. If the refugee has already been to doctor appointment in the U.S., ask them to bring any medical papers from that appointment.
      • ​A quick way to ask for the above information is to ask to see their “IOM” bag (a white, plastic bag with blue lettering).
  • Drive the refugees to the appropriate health department location. During the drive, you can remind the family what the purpose of the appointment is:
    • They are receiving a health screening from the Health Department.
    • At the screening, they will be checked for diseases and given proper immunizations.
    • This is not a doctor's appointment and they should not expect to be able to ask the kind of questions and receive the kind of care they would/will from a primary care appointment.
    • Once their Medicaid cards arrive (if not yet received), we will be assisting them with making their first primary care appointment.
    • In the meantime if anyone needs medical assistance, they can go to urgent care or to the emergency room if it is life threatening.
    • Also, they should be aware that if they do not have proper documentation of immunizations received in the past, they may be re-immunized based on health department (and school) requirements.
    • They will be offered an over-the-phone interpreter during the appointment.

Location and Procedure

Durham County Health Department

414 E. Main St. Durham, NC

  • Park in the big lot across from the building on Dillard and Main.
  • Walk across the street and around the corner of the building to get to the main doors.
  • Go straight towards the back of the building to Clinic #6.
  • You can go to the receptionist window directly across the waiting room and notify the staff that you have arrived.
  • Help to complete sign-in paperwork, and then you can either wait for the refugees to complete the appointment, or leave and return when the appointment is finished.
  • If you leave, you may want to leave your phone number with the receptionist so that you can be notified when the appointment is over.
  • After the appointment, you may transport the refugees back to their apartment or provide them with bus instructions to independently take the bus home.

Follow-up Appointment

If the client receives a follow-up appointment, please forward any information (date, time and location) to a World Relief Case Manager.

Top of Page


 

Health Screenings in Orange County

Every refugee has an initial health screening, which includes immunizations, a blood test, and a skin test to see if they have had any previous exposure to TB. Please note that it is rare for a refugee to have active TB. The purpose of the test is to determine whether there has been any previous exposure which should be treated with a precautionary series of medicine.

Assisting a refugee with a health screening

When?

Health Screenings are scheduled months in advance and last for approximately 2-3 hours. Volunteers and refugees need to arrive to the screening 15-20 minutes EARLY. Due to new efficiency measures at the Health Department, patients will not be seen at all if they are late (the exception being at the TB clinic). Missed appointments are extremely difficult to reschedule.

Before the day of the appointment:

  • Print off bus directions for the refugees - use the bus icon on Google Maps to provide the refugees with directions. This way, the refugee will also know how to get home on the day of the appointment or how to return to the health department for a follow-up appointment.
  • If the refugees being transported have children under age 8, arrange to provide age-appropriate car seats. You may provide them yourself or pick them up from the World Relief office

Day of the appointment

  • Pick up the refugee(s) from their home on the day of the appointment. Allow yourself time to arrive to the appointment at least 20 minutes early.  
  • Before leaving their home, check that the refugees have with them:
    • I-94 cards (or Visa if an SIV case)
    • Medicaid Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Social Security Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Vaccination Records
    • Medical Records. If the refugee has already been to doctor appointment in the U.S., ask them to bring any medical papers from that appointment.
      • ​A quick way to ask for the above information is to ask to see their “IOM” bag (a white, plastic bag with blue lettering).
  • Drive the refugees to the appropriate health department location. During the drive, you can remind the family what the purpose of the appointment is:
    • They are receiving a health screening from the Health Department.
    • At the screening, they will be checked for diseases and given proper immunizations.
    • This is not a doctor's appointment and they should not expect to be able to ask the kind of questions and receive the kind of care they would/will from a primary care appointment.
    • Once their Medicaid cards arrive (if not yet received), we will be assisting them with making their first primary care appointment.
    • In the meantime if anyone needs medical assistance, they can go to urgent care or to the emergency room if it is life threatening.
    • Also, they should be aware that if they do not have proper documentation of immunizations received in the past, they may be re-immunized based on health department (and school) requirements.
    • They will be offered an over-the-phone interpreter during the appointment.

Location and Procedure

Orange County Health Department

2501 Homestead Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

  • Locate nearby parking and enter the Health Department.
  • Inform the receptionist that you are assisting refugees who have health screening appointments. Ask to which part of the building you should go.
  • Help to complete sign-in paperwork, and then you can either wait for the refugees to complete the appointment, or leave and return when the appointment is finished.
  • After the appointment, you may transport the refugees back to their apartment or provide them with bus instructions to independently take the bus home.

Follow-Up Appointment

If the client receives a follow-up appointment, please forward any information (date, time and location) to a World Relief Case Manager.

Top of Page


 

Health Screenings in Wake County

Every refugee has an initial health screening, which includes immunizations, a blood test, and a skin test to see if they have had any previous exposure to TB. Please note that it is rare for a refugee to have active TB. The purpose of the test is to determine whether there has been any previous exposure which should be treated with a precautionary series of medicine.

Assisting a refugee with a health screening

When?

Health Screenings are scheduled months in advance and last for approximately 2-3 hours. Volunteers and refugees need to arrive to the screening 15-20 minutes EARLY. Due to new efficiency measures at the Health Department, patients will not be seen at all if they are late (the exception being at the TB clinic). Missed appointments are extremely difficult to reschedule.

Before the day of the appointment:

  • Print off bus directions for the refugees - use the bus icon on Google Maps to provide the refugees with directions. This way, the refugee will also know how to get home on the day of the appointment or how to return to the health department for a follow-up appointment.
  • If the refugees being transported have children under age 8, arrange to provide age-appropriate car seats. You may provide them yourself or pick them up from the World Relief office

Day of the appointment

  • Pick up the refugee(s) from their home on the day of the appointment. Allow yourself time to arrive to the appointment at least 20 minutes early.  
  • Before leaving their home, check that the refugees have with them:
    • I-94 cards (or Visa if an SIV case)
    • Medicaid Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Social Security Cards (*Only required if they have already been received in the mail)
    • Vaccination Records
    • Medical Records. If the refugee has already been to doctor appointment in the U.S., ask them to bring any medical papers from that appointment.
      • ​A quick way to ask for the above information is to ask to see their “IOM” bag (a white, plastic bag with blue lettering).
  • Drive the refugees to the appropriate health department location. During the drive, you can remind the family what the purpose of the appointment is:
    • They are receiving a health screening from the Health Department.
    • At the screening, they will be checked for diseases and given proper immunizations.
    • This is not a doctor's appointment and they should not expect to be able to ask the kind of questions and receive the kind of care they would/will from a primary care appointment.
    • Once their Medicaid cards arrive (if not yet received), we will be assisting them with making their first primary care appointment.
    • In the meantime if anyone needs medical assistance, they can go to urgent care or to the emergency room if it is life threatening.
    • Also, they should be aware that if they do not have proper documentation of immunizations received in the past, they may be re-immunized based on health department (and school) requirements.
    • They will be offered an over-the-phone interpreter during the appointment.

Location and Procedure

Wake County Human Services

10 Sunnybrook Road, Suite 335A, PO Box 14049, Raleigh, NC 27620

Here is a route that allows you to show refugees the bus stop and then park to take them to their appointment:

Before turning left onto Sunnybrook, drive up on intersection and pull into Wake Med to show them the bus stop they will have to use for future appointments. The bus stop has a foot path nearby that connects it to the health department parking lot. Point out the stop, drive to the health department and park, and then walk over and show them the path that connects to the stop. The only bus that comes to that stop is #15 so they take that to the main downtown station and then switch to the bus that takes them home. The refugees should be familiar with taking the bus from the main downtown station to their home.

  • Go inside the health department and up to the second floor. Find Clinic E.
  • Check the clients in at the desk (write down their names) and then wait with them in the waiting room until their names are called.
  • It is perfectly fine if you don't want to wait. Just explain that the appointment will probably take a couple hours and remind them to go to the bus stop and take the bus home after the appointment is finished.
    • Clients often resist taking the bus. Please think of this as a way that you are encouraging self-sufficiency. Almost every single one of our clients takes the bus home from their health screening because they are going to have to return for future appointments. We do not transport refugees to future appointments, so they will need to transport themselves in order to attend appointments. This is the same route they will use to go to their social services appointments, so it important for them to learn the bus route quickly.

Follow-Up Appointment

If the client receives a follow-up appointment, please forward any information (date, time and location) to a World Relief Case Manager.

Top of Page